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October 14, 2009

You can take the boy out of Iceland,

IMG_3112 IMG_3113 but you can't take Iceland out of the boy.  Now we realize he is not *technically* Icelandic, but he enjoyed a taste of Icelandic babyhood prior to departing Reykjavik.  We took many a long walk in all types of weather.  Like other babies, he slept in his stroller outside, cozy and warm, but with all of the good, fresh air.  We have continued the tradition here, and he still has days where he dozes outside.  The natural white noise of barking dogs and the wind whistling in the trees helps him sleep soundly.

Many things, however, have changed.  Local reactions to weather do not, in any way, parallel those we saw in Reykjavik.  One of the first things we learned about living in Iceland, was that life goes on, weather or not.  Coming out of northern Virginia, we weren't quite prepared for the variety of offerings the meteorological gods threw our way, but we eventually woke up, saw the light, and adjusted.

HPa630n-770 After first arriving, and beginning school, Cait used to freeze on the playground. She *only* had a warm jacket, ski pants, and gloves.   Then I realized that LL Bean just didn't cut it there.  I headed to the nearest 66 North, and invested in two "super-suits" for both Caitlin and Kelsey.  Cait went from hanging out by the wall, and wringing her hands, to running around with the rest of the kids, no matter what the sky sent down.

Kelsey also played outside in anything, and everything and loved it.  The kids jumped on the trampoline in snow, with nothing other than long sleeves on.  The school rules included mandatory outside time.  If you wanted a bunch of kids with pent-up energy, keep them inside after lunch, and watch things go haywire.

IMG_3118 Then we moved to California, brought oodles of winter and wet weather gear, and landed in the middle of a drought.  Water restrictions galore, tawny hills everywhere, and no umbrellas in sight.  We were told "fall - spring is the rainy season," and finally the rains came on November 1.  We were thrilled to see the skies finally open on that gloomy Saturday morning.  It continued to rain frequently, and we were loving it...until the kids went back to school.

I noticed the oddity the first time it was drizzling at drop-off.  I thought I was in the wrong place, as there were no lines of children, just one or two teachers hurrying the kids inside.  Turns out if so much as a raindrop falls, they are rushed inside as though it is hailing (in any respect).  And when it was still raining at lunchtime?

They had indoor recess, and watched tv. I was confused, and angry.  Watched tv?  Why on earth weren't they outside, playing in the rain?  Well, that's not the way it's done here.  If I remember correctly, it probably was the same in Virginia, but the Icelandic way had become natural to me.

The rainy season has come early this year, and I am revisiting last year's debacle.  Do I fight the system?  Do I offer to personally outfit the entire school with proper rain gear, to include teachers and parents?  Do I suck it up and shut up?  I honestly don't know what to do.  I would love to regale the principal with tales of my immune-system strengthened children, or how kids really enjoy jumping in puddles and will not catch a cold simply because they are outside (remember the properly clothed part).

IMG_3119 No, they will get out their energy, and retreat to the indoors, happy for the warmth, but glad for the wild and free moments trying to catch raindrops on their tongues.  Sadly, I fear I am one of the few, and my opinion will be shunned for the more popular idea that sickness will be rampant, or the kids will be wet and miserable.

So, we will have our own outdoor times.  Auntie Shannon fully outfitted Nicholas in outdoor gear for his birthday, and he has finally grown into it.  He has a jacket, pants, and puddle-stomping boots (complete with ba-bas*).  Today was not the first storm (that one took us by surprise a few weeks back), but definitely the most vigorous we have had.  Nicholas played with planters, tried to catch water in a shovel, jumped in the puddles, and watched Kelsey dive under the water pouring off the roof test her umbrella's strength.  We finally ambled inside after a good 30 minutes, and were all tired and happy campers.  It's not Iceland, but it will do for now.

*Ba-ba: his current catch-all term for an animal. 

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