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3 posts from September 2014

September 25, 2014

Rum-tastic

A few weeks ago we had the opportunity (at long last) to visit the Flor de Caña factory in Chichigalpa. In my mind, it was a much longer drive, but the reality is that even with traffic, we are a mere two hours from a rum-lover's paradise.  Now, if you know me, rum is not exactly my cup of tea.I tend to enjoy craft beers and wine more than a swallow of rum and realize why after taking the tour yesterday: it's likely just not sweet enough for me.

My office organized the trip (shocking, I know) and we headed out early on the 6th of September.  Peter and I figured the kids would not be too keen on the trip, so they stayed home to hang with friends and our empleada.  While we initially hit a tiny bit of traffic, we soon scooted past trouble spots and hit hit the open road.  Two hours later, after only one wrong turn (well, going a bit too far, but got a nice tour of Chichigalpa when we did), we ended up at the factory.

Now, when one arrives at Flor de Caña (I'm not going to try to give directions, easier just to hire a driver and enjoy the ride), there is a door that is labeled "tour."  That is actually your second stop, as you have to stop at the second entrance, the ticket booth, first, and then backtrack to the actual tour entrance. Oh, and regardless of how many people you have, one person can buy tickets for all. This is much easier than dragging everyone off the bus to pay individually.

Once we arrived at the tour door with our tickets in hand, we were led inside to a generous parking area. We were advised to stop at the restrooms first (the tour is 1.5 hours and the grounds are spacious, but no facilities), and then walked over to the engine for the first talk.

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Now, I'm going to gloss over a bit, so should gentle readers choose to visit us and go on the tour, they won't feel as though they've heard it all before (and they will get to properly sample 18 year rum!). Once we were finished with the introduction, we were loaded into a mini electric tram.  The company as a whole works to conserve energy where they can, and in fact, the energy they create from the sugar cane processing is enough to fuel the distillery and the sugar factory.

We were shuttled over to our first stop where we watched a short film about the birth of the company.  There were no questions after the film, so we then immediately headed to our next stop:  our first tasting.  I would have loved to take photos of the whole process and the interior of the tasting room, but not allowed for obvious reasons.  

The glasses were already filled when we entered the room and an expert taster waited for us and then proceeded to explain patiently exactly how to taste the rum.  I wasn't sure I needed to sip, as the aroma alone was quite intoxicating.  However, after he explained how our each of our 5 senses plays a part in the enjoyment of the taste, I couldn't help but take a sip...or two.  We finished (some of us) our samples, and then had the chance to view the barrel making facility and followed it up with a tour of a bodega, or storage room filled with barrels of rum of varying ages.

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Our last stop was the museum and gift shop.  No photos from the first level, but this sampling, on the second floor, was fine to snap a pic or two.  We finished our trip with a few small purchases (that taste of the 18 year blend sealed the deal for Peter).

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We finished our day with a trip to León  for lunch.  While not identical, the architecture was reminiscent of Granada.  We found a lovely hotel, Azul, with an airy and open cafe that serves a wide variety of dishes (from gazpacho to curry) and also carries the famous Erdmann's of Ticuantepe.  

Although a longish day from the driving, the tour was very good, well-worth the money, and our stop in Leon was refreshing.  We had been wanting to visit for a while, and will definitely go back and perhaps visit Hotel Azul again. Lucy, our hostess, and her entire staff were amazing and very accomodating for our large group of visitors, which is always appreciated.

Now, I've just read Erdmann's runs home brew workshops...off to investigate that for my craft beer loving self and perhaps another field trip is in order?

September 19, 2014

Friday Fun!

Today's Friday Fun is courtesy of a foreign body stubbornly inserting itself in my heel and refusing to be plucked out.  A few weeks ago, I was walking around in our den and felt a sharp stab in my left heel. I assumed I had stepped on a random Lego brick, since our floor is carpeted in them, and took a look at my foot.  

Nope, no such luck. I looked, saw a large sliver of glass, grabbed my fine point (technical term?) tweezers, grabbed that bad boy out, washed my foot, put on cream and band-aid and called it a day.  Well, until a few days later when my foot still really hurt and wasn't healing as fast as I expected. The pain went up and down for a few more days and I figured since I walk on my foot each day, well, maybe it was just taking longer.  Last Sunday I decided to go for a walk and while there was a little pain, I figured I could deal with it.  Then I tried to run and I knew there was no way there wasn't something stuck (now well) inside my foot.  Walking was bad, running was awful. Felt like something was digging into my foot (well, yeah...) so cut things short, limped back home and took a good look at my foot.

Oh, and I googled "glass stuck in foot" and of course got all sorts of scary stories. I tried scraping the would with tweezers rather not so gently and...this course of action is not recommended.  By Sunday night the spot that just felt like a small bump was a bigger, redder bump and a lot more painful.  I vowed to make an appointment at the health unit on Wednesday (work and school closed Monday & Tuesday for holidays) and limped around for the next two days.

Three days later it was confirmed *something* was afoot (ha!) and I was immediately given an appointment for x-rays and a visit to the orthopedic surgeon (no joke).  The x-rays (a whopping $42, paid by debit card) were easy, and 40 minutes later I was in the surgeon's office.  Nothing showed on the x-ray, but a little painful pushing on my foot and he confirmed a "foreign body" of sorts was in my foot. They made my appointment for "foreign body removal," refused to charge me until after the procedure, and I left the hospital and went back to work.  Two hours and I'd managed to have x-rays, a thorough consultation, and the commute to and from the hospital.  Not bad!

Today I dragged Pete along figuring I prolly wouldn't want to drive home and for that whole moral support thing.  Within an hour, I had my foot properly cleaned (slightly unnerving part: I had to lay on my stomach for the procedure....at least I could grip the table tightly when he was moving the needle all around the bottom of my foot?), anesthetized, the "bump" cut open, offending piece of glass removed, insided scraped VERY clean,  had it stitched up with lovely red thread, bandaged, covered with a wrap and after paying $310 for the initial consulation and procedure, I was limping along on my way.  

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The best part? I did not kick the doctor or the nurse when he gently inserted the needle in my foot and my other leg promptly shot up in the air and remained there until he was finished.  The doctor was extremely kind and gentle, and even spoke to me in English the entire time. I could have handled it in Spanish, I realize, but when I'm even a tiny bit nervous...somehow the English helps.  The worst part really was the needle .  Of course,  I'm grateful for the needles  if he tried cutting, scraping, sewing, etc., with no anesthetic...

So, there we have it.  Apparently, I hadn't had any weird back issues or random infections requiring surgery recently, so this was my payment to the medical gods this month.  I'm still a bit limpy, but already a lot less pain.  Amazing how much pain a teeny-tiny shard of glass can cause!  

And here is my healing heel in all of its glory....enjoy while I ponder what odd medical issue I will have next month.  So, if you are ever in Managua, and need an orthopedic surgeon, I have a great one for you...actually, I have a long list of wonderful medical professionals. Wonder who I will add next month?

September 10, 2014

Little tidbits

Nick still offers them, but I don't remember them all. I try to file them away in my head, occasionally note on Facebook, or blog them, when I need to just write them down somewhere...

Today was one of those long days and even though I didn't have to stress about dinner, things still seemed to crazy. I was being pulled in several directions and exhaustion and crankiness was setting in quickly.  As I was helping Nick get ready for bed, he started talking about a school project.

"So, we had to write about our favorite place in Nicaragua (said with a perfect accent).  We also had to draw a picture. So, I drew and wrote about my favorite place in Nicaragua which is Somoto Canyon."

I haven't seen the picture yet, but he drew pictures of us doing jumps off the tall rocks and floating in the water.  I have a feeling despite my wanting to continually declutter, this might be a keeper of a drawing.

After he told me about his picture, I realized I was so much calmer and less tired.  As I began to help him brush his teeth, it occurred to me that my favorite place in my home state at age 6 was likely a toss-up between my grandmother's house and the Dairy Queen (we could ride our bikes there).  Nothing wrong with that, but at that moment I was once again reminded that at the tender age of 6, the LG has lived in two states in the U.S. and two additional countries.  His favorite place in Nicaragua is a place I couldn't have imagined at his age, much less traversed through it like I owned the place. Nor did I ever ask my parents weekly, "When we move next time, what country are we going to live in?" 

Those little tidbits sometimes have a very big effect....

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